Friday, January 9, 2015

Writing a RPG

For the past year my hobby time for publishing has been consumed with some big mapping projects like the Judges Guild Wilderlands. However I have made progress on other projects by taking out my table at work during lunch and working for a half hour on some piece of writing. It slow but I am able to work on some of the other stuff want to do.

One thing that I am working is a Majestic Wilderlands/Realms RPG. While it great that +Matt Finch has released Swords and Wizardry under the OGL. The fact remains that the Majestic Wilderlands is a supplement requiring at least the Swords and Wizardry Core rules for a complete game. Which is not a problem on-line with print on demand, but is a problem with physical game stores and conventions. 

So fix this I been writing a 2nd edition of Majestic Wilderlands to work as a complete RPG. So I can hand it to somebody who don't care about the internet or retro-clones and they can still run it as a complete game.

I been running Swords and Wizardry plus Majestic Wilderlands games since its release in 2009. So what going into the book are the stuff I used in the campaign. Everything will have  commentary on the way I used it and how it actually looks within my campaigns. This also means not everything in Swords and Wizardry will make it into the book especially if I didn't use it.

Also the work is a template for a possible 5e Majestic Wilderlands supplement if things work out with Wizards releasing a open license. I been keeping notes on what certain things would look like in 5e.

I updated the character section with the missing classes (Cleric, Fighter, Magic-user) and currently in the middle of the Equipment section.

Note: 1d = 1 silver piece.

WEAPONS AND ARMOR
Quilt [+1] 10d/suit 20.0/lbs
This represents a padded tunic covering the chest, arms, and upper thighs. 
Leather, soft [+1] 25d/suit 10.0/lbs
Supple leather hide with separate pieces covering the chest, arms, and legs. Leather gloves and boots cover the hands and feet. 
Cuirboulli [+2] 50d/suit 15.0/lbs
Think leather hide that has been boiled into a rigid armor similar in shape to the various pieces of plate armor. It consists of separate pieces covering the chest, arms, and legs. Leather gauntlets cover the hands.

Linen [+2] 50d/suit 15.0/lbs
Layers of cloth treated with a resin and pressed together to form rigid armor similar in shape to plate armor. It consists of separate pieces covering the chest, arms, and legs. Leather gauntlets cover the hands.

Ring [+3] 550d/suit  25.0/lbs
Heavy leather hide with small plates or rings of metal sewn on. It is formed into a tunic that covers the chest, arms, and upper legs. Combined with cuirboulli greaves for the lower legs. Leather gauntlets cover the hands.

Scale, [+4] 600d/suit 60.0/lbs
Scales made of metal are woven together and sewn onto a heavy leather backing. Unlike ring there are no gaps in between the scales. It is formed into a tunic that covers the chest, arms, and upper legs. Combined with cuirboulli greaves for the lower legs. Leather gauntlets cover the hands.

Mail, [+5] 1,250d/suit 50.0/lbs
Rings of metal are woven together to form a suit of armor. Typically in two pieces with a tunic protecting the chest, arms, and upper legs. Mail leggings are also worn that protect the groin area, legs, and feet. Mail mittens over leather gauntlets protect the hands

Plate Armor [+6] 3,000d/suit 100.0/lbs
Steel or bronze metal formed into various pieces of armor. Separate pieces protect the chest, arms, legs, as well as articulated pieces for the feet and hands. Bronze plate is 50% more expensive due to the expense of finding and transporting the tin needed to be alloyed with copper.

Helm 100d/ea 3.0/lbs
This is a steel or bronze helmet that covers the crown of the character’s head. It comes with a guard that covers the nose.

Helm, Great 225d/ea 6.8/lbs
This is a steel or bronze helmet that completely covers the character’s head. The helmet has a detachable visor with slits to see and breathe through. The helmet can be made with removable plumage. 

SHIELDS 
Shield Slam: After making a successful attack, the target needs to make a saving throw at +2 or be knocked prone to the ground. The target has to spend a full round getting up. Anybody hitting a prone character is at +1 to hit. Fighting from a prone position is at -2 to hit for all weapons except a crossbow.

Opponentes: The shield bonus is only usable against this number of attackers. For example a defender using a buckler will only gain it's +1 AC bonus against one attacker.

Buckler 24d/ea 2.0/lbs
+1 AC, Opponents: 1, Damage: 1d4, Spike +5d; +1 damage
This small round shield held by one hand in front the character. It is made of wood and has a metal rim. The shield doesn’t cover much of the body, it is used as an active parrying weapon. The character may opt to attack with the shield. A metal spike may be affixed to the shield to increase its damage.

Shield, small 42d/ea 5.0/lbs
+1 AC, Opponents: 2, Damage: 1d6, Spike +5d; +1 damage
This round shield is strapped to the off weapon arm. It is made of wood and leather along with a metal rim. The shield covers the character’s torso. The character may opt to attack or slam with the shield. A metal spike may be affixed to the shield to increase its damage.

Shield, medium 60d/ea 7.0/lbs
+1 AC, Opponents: 4, Damage: 1d6
A larger shield in the shape of the knight’s heater. Flat on top and tapers to a shallow point on the bottom. The shield covers the character’s torso and upper thights. It made of wood with a metal rim. Nobility often paint their coat of arms on the front of his shield. The character may opt to attack or slam with the shield.

Shield, large 72d/ea 9.0/lbs
+1 AC, Opponents: 6, Damage: 1d6, Slam +1
The largest shield in the Norman kite shape. It has a round top and tapers to a long point. The shield covers the entire front of the character’s body from the neck down. It made of wood with a metal rim. Nobility often paint their coat of arms on the front of his shield. The character may opt to attack or slam with the shield.

3 comments:

Ken H said...

So no more Fudge?

Scott Anderson said...

S&W is a fine rule set and MW is a fine setting. Putting them together ought to be really nice.

Matt Celis said...

Just be sure to have it proofread. Many games are riddled with needless errors. In fact this post has a handful I noticed just the first few paragraphs, which shows how easy they are to make.